Clayton Early Learning
28Aug/12Off

Mixed Company: Preparing ALL Children for School

Rebecca Soden

Are you a parent or grandparent looking for a quality preschool experience for your child? Great news! Our high quality NAEYC Accredited school here at Clayton Early Learning would like to announce that we now have a limited number of preschool openings available for tuition-based children.

This might be news to some folks in our community who have known Clayton as a program that primarily serves low-income children and families. We recognize that this is a shift from how we have traditionally gone about improving educational opportunities within our local neighborhoods. We want to take a moment to highlight a few of the reasons WHY we are making a change to serve tuition-based families and how YOU can help us to create a future where all children are prepared for success in school and in life.

Why Are Mixed Income Preschool Classrooms Good for Kids?
Here at Clayton, we are always striving for evidence-based practices. We want to be doing the kinds of things that we know are related to better opportunities for children down the road. As universal access to preschool becomes more common across the nation, we have more evidence to help us understand the value that economic integration has for children’s school readiness. Data has been mounting for years that quality early learning experiences (especially literacy building experience that teach vocabulary and expressive language skills) help to prepare children for reading success down the road. Studies that have looked deeply at this issue have found some preliminary evidence that economic integration within preschool classrooms can lead to stronger language skills for ALL children.

  • Low Income Children – After just one year of preschool, low-income children in economically integrated classrooms moved from below the national norm (93) on language scores to above the national norm (101) while children in the low-income only classrooms were still well below the national norm in the spring (Schechter & Bye, 2007). Classroom quality was high within all of these preschool rooms suggesting that learning alongside peers from different economic backgrounds might have played a role in these gains.
  • Middle and Upper Income Children – Gains in the mixed-income classrooms were similarly strong for children who were coming from more affluent homes. The great news is that ALL children benefited, not just low-income children (Schechter & Bye, 2007).

Another reason that we are striving for economic integration is because we are working with families to gain upward economic mobility. As families in our program achieve their goals and their income levels increase, we want to provide avenues for children to stay at our school with the continuity of care that we are so committed to providing. Offering a tuition-based preschool option is one more way that we are trying to meet the needs of our families and our community.

How Can You Help?

Give the gift of high quality learning to your child. We want our preschool to be full when the new school year begins. We want every preschool child (low, middle and upper income) within Northeast Denver to have a quality early learning experience and to be fully prepared for success in Kindergarten. Please take a moment and complete an Interest Form online or call us at 303-355-4411.

Rebecca Soden

About Rebecca Soden

Rebecca Soden, Vice President for Clayton Early Learning, has 18 years of experience implementing programs for children birth to five and their families, including Early Head Start, Head Start and two multi-site Early Reading First initiatives. She provides vision and oversight to the Research, Evaluation and Professional Development services offered through Clayton. She is responsible for the creation and implementation of a continuous improvement model for using data to effectively plan and monitor early childhood programs. Her work has a special focus on supporting evidence-based programming, including caregiver-child interactions, language and literacy development, and the innovative use of technology with young children. Rebecca strives to develop communities of practice in an effort to discover what researchers and teachers can learn from each other. She serves on the Prenatal to Age 3 Subcommittee of the Colorado Early Childhood Leadership Commission. She has a Master of Science degree in Human Development and Family Studies with an emphasis in Early Childhood Education from the University of Nebraska – Lincoln and a Doctorate in Leadership for Educational Equity P-20 from the University of Colorado – Denver.
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